Filed under medical research

Aging, Falls, Music, and Dalcroze Eurhythmics

How interesting to read about the research Effect of Music-Based Multitask Training on Gait, Balance, and Fall Risk in Elderly People (abstract), an article published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The article is not freely available from the medical journal, so to read it you will need to speak with a librarian or go to … Continue reading

Senior Falls: Different Types – Different Interventions

If you have aging parents who fall — and most of us have some experience with parent falls — read the article about senior falling in the September 9, 2010 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. On its website (not active in January 2012) , the Mobilize Boston Study organization that conducted the research states that, “The purpose of the … Continue reading

Physical Capability and Aging

Research published on September 10, 2010 by British Medical Journal (BMJ), Objectively Measured Physical Capability Levels and Mortality: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, re-examined a range of published studies that looked at the physical capabilities of older adults. Conducting a meta-analysis, which is a statistical method for examining multiple studies and pooling the results, researchers reviewed results … Continue reading

Aging Mothers-Adult Daughters: Dreams of Chocolate

Just about everyone dreams of eating chocolate. Well, not everyone. My husband is someone who really doesn’t care for it that much. But recent research brings some interesting news for the rest of us — a little indulgence may be OK. According to an August 16, 2010 study, Chocolate Intake and Incidence of Heart Failure: … Continue reading

Calcium Supplements? To Take or Not to Take?

Calcium supplements are a part of a daily regimen for many aging parents and for adult children. Most of these adults take calcium supplements to build stronger bones and avoid osteoporosis. However, new peer-reviewed research suggests that the benefits of taking calcium may be outweighed by increased risk of cardiovascular events. The July 29th edition … Continue reading

Education and Dementia Risk

New dementia research conducted at the University of Cambridge finds that the brains of people with more education appear to be better equipped to deal with the effects of dementia. The announcement from the university reviews a number of past brain research results that connect education level with dementia, and then describes the new research appearing … Continue reading

Dementia and Alzheimer’s: What’s the Difference?

At the Alzheimer’s Reading Room a June post, What’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?, by Dr. Robert Stern, explains differences and clears up some common misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. A link at the end of the piece leads to the article’s original source, the ADC Bulletin, a newsletter publication of the Boston … Continue reading

Aging Parents: NIH Senior Health

The NIH Senior Health site, developed by the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine, maintains a huge library of videos. According the website, the topics are chosen to “offer up-to-date medical information, tips for healthy living, and inspiring stories of older adults who are coping with diseases or conditions of aging.” … Continue reading

Three Medical Reference Sites for Aging Parents

The other day I asked some questions about a particular medication that has been prescribed for one of my parents. When we searched for information on the web, I realized that my parents’ computer needed permanent bookmarks to three reliable health and medical information sites: Medline Plus Mayo Clinic WebMD All of my health and … Continue reading

Aging Research at 11% Tells Only Part of NIH Story

Despite Aging Baby Boomers, N.I.H. Devotes Only 11 Percent to Elderly Studies, appears in the June 28, 2010 New York Times. I tend to agree with Dr. Francis Collins, NIH head, who points out that the 11 percent does not take into consideration research conducted on the conditions such as diabetes and heart disease — health problems … Continue reading

Late-Stage Dementia, Hospitals, and Feeding Tubes

A professor at the Brown University Medical School was the lead author on a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Hospital Characteristics Associated With Feeding Tube Placement in Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia (abstract). Joan M. Teno, MD, used Medicare data from 2000 to 2007 to evaluate how … Continue reading

Causation vs. Association – the Basics

To those of us who are not scientists or epidemiologists two of the most confusing concepts in the universe are association and causation. Many of us are helping parents age as gracefully as possible in the midst of devastating diseases and are deeply frustrated that we cannot sort out the factors associated with an illness … Continue reading