Bloom Device: A New Way to Easily Stay Connected With Elders?

VMRC race I am looking forward to learning more about a new electronic touch device that’s designed to expand communication options in a family that includes elders, Created by Bloom, the device, when it comes out this fall, may make a big difference for my parents who have a new great-grandchild and want to see all that they can possibly see.

FaceTime is complicated, as is Skype, even thought my parents, my dad especially, knows how to use his iPad and my mom has an iPhone. (Check out my iPad for Dad series on this blog.) They also have an electronic frame with photos from their lives that they turn on whenever they feel like it.

Continue reading

Famed Clinicians: Prepared but Not Ready for Death

In Memoriam page at the National Institute on Aging

In Memoriam page at the National Institute on Aging – Click to enlarge.

When we think about dying, about the end of our lives, we may look to the experts for guidance — to those people who have long experience with various aspects of aging and the medical issues that complicate the process of dying. We assume that these people have their own end of life details all worked out.

This week a New York Times article by Alexandra Butler, a poet, helped us gaze into the experience of the well-prepared.

Robert N. Butler, M.D., the founding director of the National Institute on Aging, and his wife, Myrna Lewis, a social worker who specialized in support for older women, had all of the details worked out, and they shared all of this information with their daughter. Their preparations, so well conceived and worked out, assumed that Dr. Butler would pass away before his wife, but this did not happen. Just like anyone else, these two experts were confused at the unexpected turn of events. Moreover, when his wife was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer, it became clear that while they prepared and saw to the arrangements for the end-of-life, being prepared for death is a lot different than being ready to die.

In her article, Alexandra Butler writes that despite the uncertainty and challenge of watching her parents die, she was very glad that they had made the preparations for palliative care with no extraordinary interventions.

No one wants to die. Some people handle this by avoiding the topic — and the preparations. Others handle it by speaking incessantly about the expectation of dying. Still others, work hard to ensure that each minute detail is in place, so that family members spend time saying good-bye. Dr. Butler, who is also the individual who coined the term ageism, was prepared, but as his daughter points out, he was not ready.

When Dr. Butler died in 2010, I wrote this post for AsOurParentsAge.

Best Quotes

  • Our deaths are the last message we leave for those we love.
  • In a world where so many of our fellow human  beings live with threats of terror and destruction, if you are lucky enough to imaging you might have any measure of control over how you die, that is a privilege that would not go to waste.

Alexander Butler’s perspective offers support and encouragement to those of us — adult children and aging parents — as we navigate the the final years of aging.

What in the World Are Those QR Codes?

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 3.29.40 PMQR Codes. You’ve probably seen them around — on everything from cereal boxes to magazines to advertising banners on the bus or in the subway. Lots of older adults ask me about QR Codes. A common questions is, “What on earth do they do?”

QR is short for quick resource code (QR code), the scannable geometric-looking design that connects a person via smartphone or digital device to online information such as an e-mail site, a video, a website, or even a telephone number. QR codes are similar to bar codes, but the QR image contains far more encoded information — thousands of times more, in fact. Learn more about QR codes at the Common Craft video tutorial site.

A QR code is essentially a shortcut to digitized information. It might be, for instance, at the end of a book chapter, linking the reader to more content on a topic, or perhaps on an advertisement or billboard. It could link conference attendees to a workshop handout or schedule.      Continue reading

Lost in the Hospital: An Article to Check Out

I’ve just finished reading a Washington Post opinion piece, We Need to Take Better Care of Our Elderly by Jerald Winakur. The March 20, 2015 article describes a hospital experience of a 91-year-old woman, who may be the author’s mother.

Winakur, a geriatrician, describes what happens to an elder who enters the hospital’s complex world of unfamiliar physicians, none of whom are the person’s primary care physician. He describes how wide-ranging medical tests, medical care recommendations, few explanations, and very little personalized care combine to create confusion for the patient and for family members. And, of course, there are the always-connected medical devices.  Continue reading

About Half of All Americans Over 65 Have a Fall — Each Year

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 1.51.04 PM

Click to look at the CDC’s complete pamphlet.

I’ve just finished reading a Washington Post article, Strategies for Preventing Falls, Which Are Especially Risky for Older People, appearing in the online edition on March 16, 2015, It reviews the risks, examines the facts about falling, describes how to check an individual’s steadiness, and makes suggestions about the various ways a person can improve balance.

The article describes a number of tests that can evaluate whether a person is prone to falling. An aging parent should perform them with a physician or physical therapist, who can go through the series of steps and safely evaluate whether or not a person is likely to fall. Physically fit adult children can probably experiment —  carefully — at home with some of these tests. The Washington Post article explains them in detail, so I’ve just listed the tests below, and I’ve also linked several of the tests to videos.                        Continue reading

A Great Infographic on Scams: Print, Put Together & Post

scams title

Click to view the entire infographic from NeoMam Studios.

Keeping ahead of scams — a perplexing and frustrating problem.

Almost every day at my house the phone rings with a suspicious caller. It’s the same at my parents home. It used to be that people needed to worry about door-to-door and telephone scams, but now there are many more. We need to caution our aging parents (and remind ourselves) about scams that involve  junk email, stolen identity, online shopping, false investment invitations and even online dating!

How do we stay alert to all of the possibilities, and more importantly, how do we assure ourselves that our aging parents remember all of the possibilities? The good news is, I’ve been introduced to a great graphic that can help to educate our aging parents and us as well.

The folks at NeoMam Studios in the United Kingdom have created a terrific infographic that depicts the various types of scams that prey on older individuals. The great thing about this infographic is that it’s colorful and not scary — an excellent portrayal of the problems.    Continue reading